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of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset, reliability is become impossible. if you unleashed the assets of your economy, allows the stock market to boom and thread began, then all of a sudden these liabilities they seem impossible today become manageable in the future. >> george gilder, when you see the fight in congress over the debt ceiling or tax breaks
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the bountiful energy found in america, all of the natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to building and fixing up homes in 2013 than ther
. the dollar has been lower. they have talked about the gains that we have been seeing over in europe. the euro top 50. that is very interesting, as well. this is the environment. it bodes very well. another winning day here on wall street. drug stocks, bank stocks doing well. the vix, the fear index, is to the downside. let's take a look at urban outfitters. taking a look at their quarterly sales. they are looking better than expected. under their umbrella is a name brand that a lot of the teenagers know very well. they had a good block friday. urban outfitters is up over two dollars. back to you. connell: as we get close to this fiscal cliff, both sides agreeing to get serious. we have heard the house speaker will update us on the talks within that hour from house floor. we will hear what speaker banner has to say. joining us right now are to congressman. would you vote if there was an agreement? >> i think it will be a balanced plan that will increase revenues by raising the rates on upper income families, but, at the same time, agreeing to substantial cuts. connell: the reason i started by
. there is a terrible economy with 26% unemployment highest in europe, almost no job opportunities for young people frequentenly lead toro riots in the streets. here is leading democrat is suggesting cutting spending too quickly is a real problem. >> the european community now is concerned about all the austerity. there are many, many things you can do to reduce debt. but still have a stimulus aspect of the economy. >> experts though say europe's us aer the city a drag on the economic growth because it relies too much on taxation while failing to reign in the expansion of government. that would seem to back up a republican theme in the fiscal cliff argument. >> if we raise taxes on the top two rate, a million small businesses who employ 25% of the work force it will cost us over 700,000 jobs and reduce economic growth, lower take home pay and those things. that is a bad scenario. >> the league negotiator on the republican side of the table facing mr. obama says raiding taxes on upper -- raising taxes on upper income americans is not going to fix the problem that the country is facing. >> even the p
-quality problem, turning around europe, taking india by storm, talking about adding thousands upon thousands of stores throughout china, even showed you numbers that said unlike yum, kentucky fried chicken, hasn't seen any deceleration in china. these are my ears like i listen, i've watched. howard schultz, call me crazy, investing with them, my bad. and then i heard the questions from the audience, i didn't even listen. what were they looking at versus what i was looking at. they were looking at john carter, i was looking at the new bond movie. one after another, they were all down beat. is the expansion too rapid? whether demand for expensive coffee is there. i was waiting for a guy to say, listen, that triple cappuccino it stinks. if i were howard, i would tell them to take a hike. they were too negative versus what the company's up to. opportunity. starbucks was actually down. one time -- i have the apple ipad, you know, thing i'm like, wow, it's under 50. i mean, wow. terrific opportunity. ipad, i mentioned it, surprised one didn't come down and hit me over the head and knock me out. ap
. if they do keep doing it -- that helps. the businesses grew almost 100% in europe. the stock breaks out at 57. lori: we will take it. charles: relish is on me. i am taking it one step at a time. it is my third job. [talking over each other] charles: i have to make money on the side. did you see the christmas list? lori: let's do stocks based on your wife's christmas list. [ laughter ] charles: you got it. lori: let's check the markets. it has been 15 minutes since we last checked in with lauren. >> fedex shares are doing well today. they are up by just under 3%. if you took out the impact of hurricane sandy that hit in late october, fedex would have reported earnings better than expected. that would be the good news. they are keeping an outlook for the full year and also their expectations for overall u.s. economic growth. what is interesting about fedex is there air expression, they're more expensive way to ship things. if you wanted to use fedex ground, monday was the deadline. tomorrow is the deadline for ups regular ground shipping if you want those gifts in time for christmas. melissa: i
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
rain and thunderstorms. which could be on the severe side, likely too. we'll head into europe, show you what's been going on to the southeast. a low moving across turkey, brought more than 250 millimeters of rain to parts of the southwest. now, the storm is on the move, but another one just behind it, moving once again across the balkans, another 30 to 60 cent meters of snow here and it will head toward turkey after that. across the west, conditions starting to settle down here, even for central locations, really good news. high pressure expanding here. very clear for you on tuesday into wednesday. temperatures are looking pretty cold, though. london and paris, both 4 degrees around the freezing point in berlin, as well as vienna, and minus 4 in warsaw and moscow. i leave you now with your extended forecast. >>> we'll be back with more news in 30 minutes. i'm gene otani in tokyo. thank you for joining us. have a great day, wherever you are. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
factors going on here too. europe and are drowning in debt. china has a near $3 trillion reserve surplus. you've got demographics. europe and america are aging rapidly. in europe the population is shrinking. there is no such demographic problem in china. you add it all together, debt, demographics and growth rate china is indeed on course to become number one fairly soon. gregg, hold on a second. there is a danger in just extrapolating out from current trends. what's in place will go on forever. we did that with japan 30 years ago. got that one wrong. maybe we shouldn't be extrapolating like this with china. gregg: the other thing that is very conspicuous here is the enormous trade imbalance with china. our trade deficit with china has tripled over the last 10 years. point of fact i just looked it up today. we export 7%. they export 23% to the united states. isn't that a job killer for americans? >> yes it is. there is no question about it. many of the jobs which our fathers and grandfathers had in the united states left a generation ago or 10 years ago, they left for china and that's ba
from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not because of a lack evidence but because it would put the future of the largest banks at risk. think of that. not because they didn't have the goods. they were worried about the banking system. this says clearly it
are iran and eastern europe. in iran jimmy carter helped topple the shah of iran and then stood back and did not help the new rebel government to set it sell up as self governing group and the ayatollah came in and shoved aside the well meaning democrats and set up an islamist state. look at fall of the reagan wall, when that happened we sent in people to help. we sent in bookkeepers and political experts to show them how to run the political parties and say this is how free media works but just gave them the tools. so iran, the greatest threat to world peace today. and, eastern europe, america's greatest ally. >>neil: very interesting. thank you very much. i almost forgot k.t. was speaking, the world is going to end tomorrow. did nut worry. that is when the mayans say we should be ready to say goodbye. hold off on that mortgage payment. second, take a look at what a lot of survivallives are spending their money on instead. >> they have always predicted the end of the world. >> i have a good feeling about this, sweetheart. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that a
or pertain to europe or all of it? >> it pertains it a variety of things. first of all, ingenuity of u.s. corporations is outstanding. they got lean, mean and made money. profit margins went it a record high. now they are under pressure. so i'm not sure if we can keep that same level of high level profit margins. i think have you wild cards in europe and certainly we are very reminiscent of the debt ceiling fiasco we saw last year. >> yes, yes. all right, thank you, arthur. dear friend. >> my pleasure. >>> now to brian with the market flash. bri some. >> shares of aig up about 3%. their asian interest aia, basically going to get about 6 billion plus in terms of net on that deal so they will be out of that position. if you put into account, being out of their commit many to the u.s. government now putting cash in the bank to the tune of 6 to $6.5 billion, aig continues to look stronger every single day. up about 50% year to date. back to you. >> thank pup next half hour. bonds, are they in a bubble ready to burst? many thought it would happen this year, and they were wrong. we will disc
numbering your money back from europe being 30% you might make it 10%. a lot of money would come back to the u.s. and it would be good for the economy. dave: don't mean to pouu water and your idea because i agree with you it would be a great idea to have a tax holiday we have it ministrations people want from the chief economic adviser of the president on down with the administration and they say no way they are going to do this. would give the any optimism it might be done? >> people need revenue. this is positive for revenue. the money sits over cease and the u.s. treasury gets none of it. if you declare this tax holiday the money produces revenue in nd the u.s.. the change of administration at some point. dave: are you hearing anything about this? we ask the administration specifically about this, they say we won't let it happen. >> that is what we heard. they are not going to let it happen but it would be great if they did because of what has already been pointed out. we need to spur this economy and of the fiscal cliff developed and small-businesses our hits we have to have growt
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor frank keating. next on the panel, we have the institute fellow and the r
because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a further step. again if it happens, it could be another step in building pressure on china to enforce the u.n. security council sanctions on north korea and in fact to team up with the rest of the world to try to apply stronger sanctions and more effective sanctions on north korea. jon: kim jong-un and his father indicated, they proved time and time again they were more interested in having ballistic missiles and that kind of technology than they were in seeing their people fed. are you convinced that there is a way to impose
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
and grow when the entitlement culture become permanent like europe. of the last one. you are a young man surrounded by people the same age. when you come out and talk like you are talking now what is the reaction? >> a lot of the marston's. they never heard it before especially from teachers across the country. they never heard the tenets of capitalism in our schools and that is what our group turningpoint usa is doing. i go to lecture halls and high school band is about talking about the morality of capitalism versus the morality of government dependency and i truly believe young people want to be free. young people want to make their decisions and because of that there is hope. stuart: if you ever come in your queue set on the set with us because we like what you have to say. good stuff indeed. thank you. you want to add anything to that? you are the ceo when you hired these youngsters. >> i agree. stuart: do you seeethat entitlement mentality in the work force, the young work force that is coming in? >> i see and that mentality, i don't agree with the president on his position on enti
, the bad news with merck on the cholesterol drug already approved in europe did not approval america. they spend a lot of money to come up with nothing in this country. for these companies to go out, getting some penetration in the marketplace, one of these rumors that may be viable. this is the $20 stock back in june so there's a lot of room to the upside. we take half on these ford of things especially if you make 14% to wait three four days and take it, not all that bad a cat and a month's run. dennis: is that flighty? a good company with good prospects and a takeover possibility why shouldn't i let my -- not take half of it? charles: it is called death of coin. how often the make 4% in three days? there are other competitors out there. doesn't have to be acquired. the public perception won't be as good. there are enough and knowns to register a little bit. cheryl: thank you. dennis: 15 past the hour, stocks every 15 minutes. team coverage, jeff flock in the trading pits of the cme, all the bad weather in the midwest, first nicole petallides on the stock exchange, the dow down. ni
this time on the southern coast of the mediterranean, it's very clear that europe will be vulnerable and indeed we will be worldwide, so it seems to me this is something that we should be involved in, but our friends in europe really have a lot at stake here, too. >> ambassador, we want to also ask you tonight about former vice-president dick cheney's latest remarks. now, last night he blasted president obama's foreign policy in the middle east. here's what he said in part. >> i think certainly in my conversations with many of those people, they no longer believe us. they no longer trust us. they no longer believe they can count on the united states of america to do what we did 20 years ago. our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president can make bold statement and bold talk as he did in the last couple of days but development in syria, but i don't think they care. > >> greta: ambassador, what do you think about the former vice-president's mark? >> sadly, i think he's on target. i don't think the administration has credibil
are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying on jack kemp's legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause] >> now, this is 35 minutes. >> thank you. one of the highlights of the campaign for me is when i got to travel to meet paul's mom. >> thank you. i am really privileged to be her
cannot the other way around. and this makes as special among the nations of europe. our government has no power, expt that granted it by the people. it is time to check and reverse the growth of govenment, which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed. it is my intention to curb the size and influence of the federal establishment and to demand recognition of the distinction between the powers granted to the federal government and those reserves to the states or to the people. [applause] lou: reagan's original february 1981 plan proposed in that speech, enough cuts to bring spending down to 19 percentnt of gdp by 1984 ando balance the budget. the federal government started the 2013 budget year with a $292 billion deficit in the first two months. the nation not exactly on incorrect path to what was the reagan vision three decades ago. >> this is what democracy looks like. lou: a union demonstration turned violent. michig state pro worker law cutting in to union dues. unions don't like it. one of their state legislativ supporters says, there will be blood. we will s
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
in their friday trading. most by about 1%. markets across europe were also weaker in early trading. we'll have a lot more of this coming up later in the broadcast. >>> and the nation pauses today to remember those killed just one week ago in newtown. >> what a remarkable week it's been. among those is the first lady, who has written a letter in this morning's "hartford courant." she writes, may the memories of those beautiful children and those heroic adults be a blessing for your community and for our country. >> and for more on the somber ceremonies, we're joined by wendy gillette in newtown. good morning, wendy. >> reporter: good morning, rob and sunny. newtown is a very different place. one week ago, at this time, it was a different place. a quiet, small town where violence was extremely rare. now, as the nation continues to heal after the massacre, many will pause this morning to remember what was lost. bells across connecticut will toll 26 times at 9:30 this morning, marking the exact moment when terror invaded sandy hook elementary school. governor dan malloy called for a moment of sile
family. it is still in europe however because bad weather is keeping it at the dock. >>> well, today on ktvu channel 2 news at 5:00, continuing coverage over that fiscal cliff crisis, more on that plus what happens to your paycheck and your monthly income if lawmakers fail to make a deal by january 1st. >>> thanks for trusting ktvu channel 2 news, we are going to see you the next time news breaks also we are always here for you on ktvu.com and mobile ktvu.com, have a great thursday everyone. send comments to comments@captioncolorado.com captions by terry james, caption colorado, llc. [ female announcer ] now get high speed internet at home on our newly expanded advanced digital network, a connection you can count on. introducing at&t u-verse high speed internet with more speed options, reliability and wi-fi hot spots than ever. call at&t now to get u-verse high speed internet for as little as $14.95 a month for 12 months with a one-year price guarantee. it's the fastest internet for the price. our newly expanded advanced digital network gives you more of what you enjoy online. and wi
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
: the waft is sweeping europe and soon to be on our shores. at juniper kitchen restaurant in ontario, he creates a revolutionary eating experience. show us how it's done. >> since you said you like mint chocolate chips, we're going to do that. so just straight, raw ingredients. mint and cocoa mint, put these together, a little syrup. a little chocolate. we're going to strain all that out. let's see what happens. there's the straw. >> reporter: it's like an ice cream cloud. with endless flavor combinations, he can turn any meal into a culinary quiz show. let's see if you can trip me up. >> this one might stump you. >> cherry? >> no. >> reporter: raspberry. >> that's it. >> reporter: round two, here we go. >> classic cocktail. you almost got it. >> reporter: is this a mojito? >> yes, it is. >> reporter: and i'm cuban and it took me that long to get that one. >> our hold friend tonya rivero. i still got to chew. i don't know about you. >> i don't know if he makes a potato chip vapor. >> i'm still going for it, though. >> you can still inhale those. >> that's how charlie sheen eats. >>> this
with nutrients. and considered fine dining. and always have been in europe. >> always have been in europe. but the u.s. has been squeamish about those types of meat. >> not anymore. >> not anymore. >> but today, you have two dishes to start any meal. let's get started. the first one, is something with pomegranate. >> i want to start with chicories. they're bitter greens. most people have a beef or ham, a turkey. you want to have something that's going to be a little bitter that will cut that richness. so, we try to work with, you know, a little bit of bitter greens. this is your standard treviso. i'm going to cut that nice. really festive colors. really beautiful. >> and this is kosto franco. >> it likes -- >> i'm going to take out that core. watch out. i don't like to cut this green. i like to tear it. >> and you also have pomegranates. are these pistachios? >> these are pistachios. you have all these vibrant colors here. really simple. and now, pistachios are going to add a nut meat, fat protein to it. >> how do you get them out of the pomegranate? >> that is so hard. >> would you mind
coming under pressure recently starting to turn. europe seeing improvement helping equities along as well. lori: not sure if you mentioned the fed. we were talking about it at the top. talking about their expectations of ben bernanke. nicole: would even throw out the idea of stimulus? that helped things along pushing us along throughout this entire last six months. lori: absolutely. thank you so much, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. protests turn violent in lansing, michigan, as union protesters ripped down a tent belonging to right-to-work supporters. becoming the 24th right-to-work states today allowing workers to get the right to join unions. jeff flock is in lansing michigan covering the story for us. i thought it was interesting how you covered the scene there with michigan a few years back, excuse me, wisconsin. >> wisconsin, exactly. not the same kind of intensity. part of that is because this is already pretty much a done deal. there they had not a teacher headed off. the second one being debated right now. but renew over here to the scene of the geo
and the environment. europe, japan and russia are also expected to continue to decline. connell: a matter of time, as they say. this fox business exclusive, we will talk about the war on business. it was a record year for anti-trust funds. dagen: the sanctions against iran. if this policy will change anything over there. the state of the economy and why it matters to you and this, the cost of crude oil. take a look at it. more than $86 a barrel. stubbornly high. ♪ >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life side down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you % today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they caopen bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have t most corehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't
forecast. europe offers the same lesson in reverse. thank you. as jim says, every time we talk about this, they keep taking the wrong -- lindsey graham said we're going to be greece. yeah, if we do what you want! the best way to generate jobs and growth is for the government to spend more, not less. and for taxes to stay lor owe become lower on the middle class. so you know, just -- >> roosevelt made that mistake in 1937 when the deficit hawks were saying we gotta slow this thing down. things started reverting to the depression era. levels and he quickly changed course. >> stephanie: rise finishes by saying most of the media have bought into the narrative it stems from an out-of-control budget deficit. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. he said -- let's see. interest rates he was talking about are lower than they've been in our living memory. in fact, if there was ever a time for america to borrow more to put people back to work, rebuilding our schools and crumbling infrastructure, it is now. robert reic
on foreign relation, which is an important group to speak to in new york. she could go to europe and speak to yacht. she could people to the european parliament. >> bill: she'll make a lot of money giving speeches. >> she could and keep herself relevant until late -- by keeping herself out of the campaign rakes she keeps the target minimized. she's a very polarizing figure. lots of things for her critics to attack her on. the longer -- >> bill: real quick, do you expect a book from the woman? >> oh, yeah. absolutely. >> bill: okay. now, there is another woman in the c.i.a., and i want to spend a lot of time. about this woman who tracked down bin laden and then got into all kinds of trouble. do we know who this woman is? do you know her? >> yeah. we do believe we know who she is. we're not going to use her name on the program. but it's believed she was an analyst at c.i.a.'s afpac analysis unit, afghanistan and pakistan. she was an early believer that you could use -- you could track the courier system through al-qaeda in and around the cities, not the caves of pakistan, to get to bin laden
they react. one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the reason we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more >anne applebaum from her historical narrative, "iron curtain," sunday night on "q &a " on that night at 8:00. >> at 10:00 eastern, efforts to increase homeownership programs hosted by the burping institution. in 30 minutes, the national taxpayer advocate discusses what the fiscal cliff needs for -- means for tax filing season. the doc fix will be explained that at 9:15, i look at how the u.s. population is expected to u.s. population is expected to change over the
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
traveled to 15 countries over the last four years. i told these companies that built the rails in europe and asia, come to america. invest in america. many of them are here now. in the absence of congress not providing the money but the leadership of the president's providing the money, we would get there with public money. until we do, we will use private dollars. >> with all respect, there is not 50 minutes worth of vision in this congress. the chairman likes to exclude himself. i very much respect and i believe it is the way to proceed not to give up on high-speed rail. i beg you not to get up. -- giv eup. e up. if you continue to flake this money out, it in the end there will be huge criticism of the administration for having nothing to show for a bond. above is a possible for you to think you're a fiscal priority based on a real time vision of what lies ahead for us in the next five years so that we might prioritized among these projects which for example have state go ahead. the projects were you see an opportunity for private sector funding. on some rational basis, we're going to
all too common. the country sends goods all the over the u.s. and europe. this factory had links through subcontractors to retail giants such as wal-mart, sears and disney. but safety is often ignored in the pressure to keep production moving for a global supply chain. the enter in the labor rights forum says more than 600 people have died in bangladesh garment factory fires since 2005. this blaze was followed two days later by a 12-story fire in another part of the town. there were no deaths in that blaze. for more on all this we turn to steven greenhouse who covers labor and workplace issues for the noork times. thanks for being with us. steven, bring us up to speed. after that fire there were documents an activist group put out which seemed to indicate retailers unwilling to pay for some of the safety upgrades. >> yes. documents came out from a that was held last year in bangladesh. a meeting called by the government and by the bangladesh manufacturers association that was urging those giant western retailers like the gap, like wal-mart to like step up to the plate and agree t
and paying a fine. the justice department announced agreement with hsbc the biggest bank in all of europe. as part of of the deal hsbc agrees to pay $1.9 billion in fines. a lot of money certainly. but for this bank it's the equivalent of roughly seven weeks of profits. in exchange, these are among the charges that will now disappear. laundering more than $880 million in drug money. and allowing $660 million in prohibited transactions from countries including libya, cuba, burma, sudan and iran. federal prosecutors say the bankers didn't just look the other way, they actually went a step further. one occasion hsbc instructed a bank in iran on how to format payment messages so that the transactions would not be blocked or rejected by the united states. >> shepard: in other words, the bankers told the iranians how to get around our laws. in a statement, the bank's chief executive says we accept responsibility for our mistakes. we have said we are profoundly sorry for them and we do so again. so the bank is sorry but again nobody is going to prison. prosecutors say some people at the justice
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